Posts Tagged ‘design’

postheadericon Is Google About to Top the Browser Charts

As many of us are aware, internet browsing became popular through the use of a trusted and well known piece of software called Internet Explorer.  For many years, IE dominated the internet browsing world, with only a little bit of competition from Netscape on Windows and Safari on Mac, but that time came to an end.  According to statistics from www.w3schools.com, internet explorer has been on a steady decline in market share since March of 2003, where it peaked at 80% of the market share.  9 years later their market share has dwindled down to only 19.5%.

In January of 2009, Mozilla Firefox overtook Internet Explorer as the most popular browser.  However, by July of that year, it too started to decline in market share as a new competitor, Google Chrome, began its accent to the top.  By April of 2010, Google surpassed IE, taking over the number 2 spot behind Firefox, and has been continuously gaining ground since.

As of last month, Google has edged itself to within .3% of Firefox with 36.3% vs. Firefox’s 36.6%.  IE is down to 19.5%, like mentioned above, with Safari and Opera rounding out the remainder with 4.5% and 2.3% respectively.  If the trend continues, by next month, we may be hailing Google Chrome as the champion in this browser competition, at least for the time being.  As Internet Explorer and Firefox have demonstrated, nothing lasts forever.

How does this affect web developers and the population in general?

As many website designers and developers would attest to, Internet Explorer has been a thorn in our side for the last few years.  As Firefox and Chrome, along with Safari and Opera, embraced the most advanced technologies available, IE has been steadily falling behind, causing developers to need to almost develop an entire side twice.  Once for Internet Explorer and once for the rest of the world.  In addition, there are so many features that are lacking in older versions of Internet Explorer, that anyone running IE8 would never be able to see the websites they visit living up the glory that they have.

The good news is that IE9 at least brought potential fixes to some of these features, even if developers need to use different coding in some cases to achieve the same results.

The bad news is that IE9 won’t work on machines running Windows XP, which according to the same source above, is still used by over 31% of internet users.

More good news: Microsoft recently announced that IE10 will be debuting shortly, and is currently in developer testing stages.  You can download a version of it if you want, but we wouldn’t recommend it unless you are an experienced web developer.

More bad news: Microsoft has decided that IE10 will not be available on anything before Windows 7, which to be fair has garnered about 47% of the market at this point.  Still, this leaves anyone running Windows XP with only one way of viewing the latest technologies: drop Internet Explorer and go for one of the top dogs, either Firefox or Chrome.

Personally, as a Chrome user,  I am all for it taking the #1 spot.  Nothing against Firefox, mind you.  It is a good and stable browser, but with Google behind it, I see lots of potential for Chrome, including functionality between it, Google’s Android mobile phone operating system, and Google Chrome OS, Google’s attempt at taking cloud computing to a ridiculously new level.

If you are a Chrome user too, great!

If you are a Firefox user, your days as #1 may be up, but I wish you the best of luck.

If you are a Safari or Opera user, I don’t understand why you chose what you did, but I can appreciate your choice.

If you are using IE9, it could be worse, I suppose.

If you are still using IE8 or earlier, you may want to consider upgrading if possible or better yet switching to a different browser.  Just try it out.  It doesn’t take long to adjust and you can be sure you are seeing the website in the way website developers want you to.

postheadericon Design Your Future At the Right School

So you’re passionate about web design and perhaps you’re contemplating enrolling in a web design program or institution. Now what? Well it doesn’t have to be as hard as you think. When you’re searching for the perfect design school it’s easy to become overwhelmed with the variety of options out there. Which is why you should prepare yourself by becoming aware of any preliminary factors to applying to a web design college or university before you decide which application to submit.

Know your Focus First and foremost, while you know that you want to be a web designer, it’s important to know your focus within the program. Since not every design school has the same curriculum, it’s good to know what courses you’re walking into before hand and whether or not they would be beneficial to your focus. There are plenty of roles you can take on as a designer and it’s good to know exactly what it is you want to do with your web design education and what kind of role you want to play in the web design world.

Know the Requirements You should know the requirements for a web design program. Whether you’re fresh out of high school or may be interested in continuing your education after attaining your college degree somewhere else, each college or university has their own preliminary requirements for entering their web design program. Although a lot of the criteria consist of general and common courses, pre-requisite classes and exams may be required before you can qualify to submit an application.

It’s also wise to know which schools are accredited and which are not so if you ever want to transfer or attain an additional degree at another institution, you want to make sure your credits transfer without a problem. If the school is not accredited you can become at risk for non transferable credits and ultimately may have to retake some courses. Not only that but if you graduate from an accredited school, your degree holds a much higher value.

Know the Curriculum It doesn’t hurt to visit the college or university’s website so you can catch a glimpse at the courses and course descriptions. This helps you prepare both mentally and financially when it comes to the course work-load, the information you will learn from your web design courses, any additional supplies you may need as well as textbooks.

Whether you’re considering attending a college campus or an online university, you can’t go wrong figuring out the basics of your search. Your dream web design school isn’t too far from your reach! As long as you do your research early, figure out what it is you really want to do within the field of web design and prepare yourself from there, you can’t go wrong. Remember to find what fits YOU best and the rest will fall into place. Good luck with your search!

postheadericon Keep This in Mind When Designing Your Site

When designing a memorable website there are many elements you should consider. Appearance, Navigation, Content, and overall site performance are significant components in the building process of your company website. You should consider what exactly it is you want your consumers and site visitors to take away from your site so that you know what to tell your web designer beforehand. I guess you can call it your blueprint. This will make the design process a little less complicated.

Making sure your website is user friendly is the first step in the process of designing your site. You want to make sure your website is easy to navigate by not allowing your site to be cluttered with graphics that will reduce allotted speed time. You also want to make sure that whatever content that comprises your site isn’t overbearing and is of quality. Let’s get real, a lot of visitors don’t read each and every word on a website, they skim and scan, so it’s good to not overwhelm web users with too many words and to make sure the words you do use are intriguing enough to keep them focused on your brand and no one else’s.

By having an attractive website, users will instantly receive gratification and confidence in the company they are viewing. It’s easy to become awed by an attractive website and ultimately makes you want to know more about the company and who these fabulous people are behind the meticulous design of their site. Using creative and large images are eye openers alone. Experiment with different color schemes and make sure everything looks neat and organized. If the company is honest about its design and appeal then they must be honest about their products and services, right?

Users don’t want to have pop up pages for each category of every section from a scroll bar of groups. Does that make sense? Of course not. When you visit a site, you want to be able to navigate to and through different areas of the website’s information departments without worrying about a bunch of different windows that take up your whole tab bar or multiple browsers. This can be an instant discouragement, and you don’t want that.

These are just some brief and simple components to take into consideration whether you’re designing your very own website. Either way, it’s significant to brainstorm your ideal website before putting it into action. After all, this site will represent your company and what you stand for. May as well think it through carefully and make sure your visitors are satisfied enough to visit again, and again…and again. Maybe they’ll even want to become a loyal customer. Now there’s a thought.

postheadericon Web Design vs. Web Development: What’s So Different?

Most commonly people believe that web design and web development are just two different terms for the same thing. Well, not exactly. It’s understandable why you would think this way considering they both go hand in hand, have many similarities, and you can’t really have one without the other. But they aren’t the exact same thing.

Web design focuses on the visual aspect of the website, the appearance. After all the key word in Web Design is…design. It’s basically a given but at the same time there is a little bit more that can go into design that also compliments Web Development. While web design can also involve basic coding like html and css web designers also utilize graphics, basic art and other design tools to produce a creative website. The design of the website also involves the smoothness of its navigation, the chicness in the appearance and the balancing of the two.

Wed Development is an elaboration of web design. Again the two go hand in hand, so while the design aspect is focused on the display of the site, development is what allows the design to be generated through codes, programming and other various elements. The web development process is what keeps the site running adequately.

In a nutshell you see the main differences between the two, and while they are pretty similar, they still each have their own identities and play different roles in the process of developing a website.

This picture is a great [and hilarious] approach to distinguishing the differences between a web designer and a web developer. Enjoy! [Image via www.sixrevisions.com]